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Malaria from many angles

World Malaria Day may have come and gone, but our PLoS ONE authors certainly seem to be keeping in the spirit, with three new malaria-related publications in the last week.

On Friday, we published “Distributed Medical Image Analysis and Diagnosis through Crowd-Sourced Games: A Malaria Case Study,” by a group of authors from University of California, Los Angeles. Today we have two more to add to the list: “Investigation of Host Candidate Malaria-Associated Risk/Protective SNPs in a Brazilian Amazonian Population,” from an international team of authors from Brazil and the UK, and “Algae-Produced Pfs25 Elicits Antibodies that Inhibit Malaria Transmission,” from University of California, San Diego.

I love how these articles all tackle aspects of a single problem, but in such different ways, from the patient to the mosquito host to the causative parasite, and from diagnosis to treatment to prevention. This breadth of coverage highlights the incredible richness and diversity of malaria research, and of the broader scientific research community as well, which is very important for a multidisciplinary – and frequently interdisciplinary – journal like PLoS ONE.

Citations:

Mavandadi S, Dimitrov S, Feng S, Yu F, Sikora U, et al. (2012) Distributed Medical Image Analysis and Diagnosis through Crowd-Sourced Games: A Malaria Case Study. PLoS ONE 7(5): e37245. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0037245

da Silva Santos S, Clark TG, Campino S, Suarez-Mutis MC, Rockett KA, et al. (2012) Investigation of Host Candidate Malaria-Associated Risk/Protective SNPs in a Brazilian Amazonian Population. PLoS ONE 7(5): e36692. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0036692

Gregory JA, Li F, Tomosada LM, Cox CJ, Topol AB, et al. (2012) Algae-Produced Pfs25 Elicits Antibodies That Inhibit Malaria Transmission. PLoS ONE 7(5): e37179. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0037179

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